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Four reasons employers lose their best staff.

CultureSeptember 21, 2016

Every employer knows the value of good employees. They are one of the most valuable aspect of any business, driving its productivity and making employers’ lives a little bit easier as a result. So why is it that sometimes the best employees are the ones leaving?

Employers may be quick to blame poor employee retention on any number of things, yet if your employees are constantly leaving, then it is time to have a look at what you as an employer may be doing wrong.

1. Lack of acknowledgement or progression

An employee who feels as if they never receive recognition for a job well done will eventually feel demoralised and unappreciated. It has been proven that lack of recognition is a main contributor for why employees leave workplaces. It is easy to underestimate how far a “good work” comment can go towards boosting an employee’s motivation, especially those who are constantly giving their all to get a job done. It is a small thing, but any gesture of appreciation will go a long way with your staff.

Employees who feel there is no progression in their job will also feel stale and taken for granted, especially if an external person is hired to fill a role rather than the employee having the opportunity to express an interest. It is good practice to advertise an available role internally, before advertising to the external market.

2. Poor leadership

It is the age old saying: employees do not leave companies, they leave their managers. Having a bad manager will contribute to an employee’s desire to no longer work for a company. Poor leadership can include being unsupportive, uncommunicative or not providing the correct support an employee requires to succeed. An employee who feels they cannot count on their manager is unlikely to thrive under their leadership.

A good leader should provide the employee with direction and feedback, take the time to have one on one meetings and be available if the employee requires assistance. If there is a poor relationship between an employee and their manager, this may be a contributing factor to why staff do not want to stay with a company.

3. A negative working environment

No one wants to work in a negative environment. This can be either physical environment or a negative workplace culture. A lack of team work with others within the team, or other departments, can lead to employees feeling isolated and alone. Having a working environment which is not inviting (such as poor lighting or undesirable climate control) or even unsafe, can all be contributing factors towards employees leaving.

Workplaces do not need to be fun, but they do need to be a comfortable environment which encourages employees to do their best work. Productivity will not thrive if a workplace is unappealing or has an unfavourable culture.

4. Overworked

An employee who is constantly bombarded with tasks will eventually burn out. While it can be tempting to pile jobs onto your good employees as you know they will get completed, and to a high level, this is a sure fire way of being seen to punish an employee for good performance.

If you are required to increase an employee’s workload, ensure you take the time to monitor how they are tracking and whether they require assistance to get the jobs done. Employees should always feel they can ask for help, or extended deadlines if needed.

If you have any queries about how to best manage your employees, or understanding your obligations as an employer, call Employsure today on 0800 675 700.

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